Commonplace Book, 13

What is a commonplace book? For me, this is a space where I post interesting links, reflections on what I’m reading, and the newest recipes I’ve been trying out — a collection of miscellaneous micro-posts.

What I’m fixing:

  • Yogurt-Marinated Chicken with Creamy Greek Sauce, for my lovely husband, who mowed the lawn. I’ve made it before, but had kind of forgotten about it — I tend to prefer recipes where you can do almost everything at your leisure, as with the slow cooker. But this is super easy, and makes J happy.
  • A not exceedingly good tomato cobbler, although that was probably my fault: too many caramelized onions, too few tomatoes.
  • A pretty exceedingly good batch of French toast from a loaf of Amish peach bread my aunt-in-law brought. FRENCH TOAST, HOW HAD I FORGOTTEN YOU?

What I’m reading:

“Forged love, married love, love that starts molten and throughout its life must be thrown back into the fire, recast, reshaped, restored. […] Married passion is a quest, in the end, and the lovers are its heroes, fighting along the way demons of their own making and of others, changing identities, carving their initials into each other’s hearts.”

and

“Perhaps, if anything, the meaning in this book for others may be this: Here is a job in which it is not unusual to be, at the same instant, wildly joyous and profoundly stressed.”

and

“I adore the privilege of our babies’ constant care even though to write a paragraph requires long preparation. […] One reason there is not a great deal written about what is like to be the mother of a new infant is that there is rarely a moment to think of anything else besides the infant’s needs.”

unrelated image of beautiful produce
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Author: Katherine Grimm Bowers

Babies. Books. Fledgling housewifery. Once and future librarian. Catholic. Always thinking about chocolate ice cream.

2 thoughts on “Commonplace Book, 13”

    1. Yes! I saw that piece, too, and while Blue Jay wasn’t listed I think it could qualify as a forerunner. Parts of it were a little too poetical for me, and unfortunately Erdrich seems angry at institutional religion, but there were some beautiful passages and striking insights.

      Liked by 1 person

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